How to Prepare the Pet for Adoption

First and foremost, spay or neuter the pet or the stray you are trying to place. Without this procedure, no reputable humane rescue group will help you. Pet overpopulation is an overwhelming problem and we all need to do what we can to prevent more unwanted animals from being born. If you want information on low–cost clinics in your area, call SPAY/USA at 1–800–248–SPAY. You can also visit their website, www.spayusa.org, or the PETS 911 website, www.pets911.com.

Next, make sure the animal is up–to–date on vaccinations. Prepare a complete medical record that you can give to the adopter. If you’re trying to find a home for a stray, you’ll need to bring the animal to a vet for a thorough checkup. Low–cost assistance may be available through local humane groups.

You should also prepare a general history of the pet. Include as much information as possible about the pet’s likes and dislikes, current food preferences and favorite treats, relationship to other animals, and preferred types of toys. All this information will help the adopter get acquainted with the pet and make the transition easier on the animal.

To show the pet’s best side, groom and bathe him or her before taking your flyer photos and before showing the pet to a prospective adopter. If it is relevant, talk to a trainer about your pet’s disposition. The help of an experienced and caring professional can often help you resolve quirky or destructive behavior, making it easier to place the pet in a new home.

How to Screen Potential Adopters

When someone responds to your flyer or ad, you’ll want to interview them over the phone before introducing them to the animal. By doing so, you can eliminate unsuitable potential adopters early on. The following are some guidelines for helping you find the best possible new home for your pet or rescued animal.

First, if the caller is a child or a teenager, ask to speak to an adult. If the caller sounds young, but isn’t a child, ask for his or her age. In our experience, young people tend to move around a lot – going to college, entering the military, looking for work – which means that they change their living situations often. You are looking for a permanent new home, so a young person may not be the best bet for your pet. However, there are always exceptions to any rule. If you feel the caller can offer a lasting home, despite his/her age, then take it to the next stage and conduct the interview.

How to Prepare the Pet for Adoption

First and foremost, spay or neuter the pet or the stray you are trying to place. Without this procedure, no reputable humane rescue group will help you. Pet overpopulation is an overwhelming problem and we all need to do what we can to prevent more unwanted animals from being born. If you want information on low–cost clinics in your area, call SPAY/USA at 1–800–248–SPAY. You can also visit their website, www.spayusa.org, or the PETS 911 website, www.pets911.com.

Next, make sure the animal is up–to–date on vaccinations. Prepare a complete medical record that you can give to the adopter. If you’re trying to find a home for a stray, you’ll need to bring the animal to a vet for a thorough checkup. Low–cost assistance may be available through local humane groups.

You should also prepare a general history of the pet. Include as much information as possible about the pet’s likes and dislikes, current food preferences and favorite treats, relationship to other animals, and preferred types of toys. All this information will help the adopter get acquainted with the pet and make the transition easier on the animal.

To show the pet’s best side, groom and bathe him or her before taking your flyer photos and before showing the pet to a prospective adopter. If it is relevant, talk to a trainer about your pet’s disposition. The help of an experienced and caring professional can often help you resolve quirky or destructive behavior, making it easier to place the pet in a new home.

How to Screen Potential Adopters

When someone responds to your flyer or ad, you’ll want to interview them over the phone before introducing them to the animal. By doing so, you can eliminate unsuitable potential adopters early on. The following are some guidelines for helping you find the best possible new home for your pet or rescued animal.

First, if the caller is a child or a teenager, ask to speak to an adult. If the caller sounds young, but isn’t a child, ask for his or her age. In our experience, young people tend to move around a lot – going to college, entering the military, looking for work – which means that they change their living situations often. You are looking for a permanent new home, so a young person may not be the best bet for your pet. However, there are always exceptions to any rule. If you feel the caller can offer a lasting home, despite his/her age, then take it to the next stage and conduct the interview.